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    Lectin Shield

    4.79 out of 5
    165 Reviews

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    Lectin Shield

    4.79 out of 5
    165 Reviews

    Choose Your Package

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    If you’re not 100% satisfied with your product for any reason, you’re covered by our 100% money-back guarantee (does not cover shipping and handling) for 90 days. For refunds, contact our customer support team at (800) 852-0477 and we’ll refund your purchase, no questions, no hassle.

    About

    Lectin Shield

    Lectins are a protein present in many plant-based foods we eat. They can interfere with your digestion, energy, and overall health. Lectin Shield is a unique blend of potent compounds designed to help your body eliminate these toxic proteins.

     

    • Promotes regularity and pleasant bathroom visits
    • Helps reduce feelings of gas and bloating
    • Aids against out-of-control food cravings

    Suggested Use

    Take 2 capsules, twice a day, with 2 of your largest meals.

    What’s in Lectin Shield?

    FAQ


    Gundry MD Lectin Shield: 9 Lectin-Blocking Ingredients

    Now, let’s look a little closer at each of the 9 ingredients in Lectin Shield and how they work on certain foods containing lectins…

    N Acetyl D-Glucosamine

    N Acetyl D-Glucosamine binds to harmful lectins from wheat.1 Since wheat lectins have been associated with joint problems, this wheat lectin blocker is also a popular ingredient in joint health supplements.2

    Bladderwrack

    Bladderwrack, a powerful seaweed, has been shown in studies to bind to dangerous, inflammatory lectins.3 Studies also suggest Bladderwrack has antifungal properties against Candida yeasts.4

    D-Mannose

    D-Mannose is a potent natural compound that binds to specific lectins in legumes, a lectin rich food.5 Research indicates it can also help your body protect itself from infectious bacteria.6

    Okra (Fruit)

    Okra is your source for raw polysaccharide (RPS), a powerful compound that binds to multiple toxic lectins.7 As a concentrated source of polyphenols, okra extract has been shown to have powerful antioxidant and anti-fatigue properties.8

    Mucin

    Mucin helps to form a slippery protective barrier inside your digestive tract.9 Not to mention, the sialic acid in mucin binds to multiple sources of foods containing lectins, including those found in wheat and several types of berries.10

    Sodium Alginate

    When you’re dealing with lectin-based digestive problems, sodium alginate can be your best friend. It also acts as a “fecal bulking agent,” which can help make bathroom visits much more pleasant and less frantic.11

    Vegetable Peptase

    When you eat lectins they inhibit peptidase, an important enzyme your body uses to break down proteins in your food, spelling trouble for your digestive tract.12 So, I’ve included vegetable peptase in Lectin Shield to assist your protein digestion and counteract the digestive effects of lectins.

    Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM)

    I mentioned earlier that foods containing lectins, particularly wheat lectins, have been tied to joint pain.13 MSM has been shown to be a powerful agent for helping to reduce joint pain — especially if you use it in combination with N-Acetyl D Glucosamine above.14

    Larch Arabinogalactans

    Arabinogalactans have been shown to increase butyrate production in gut bacteria.15 Butyrate nourishes your gut lining, which is your first line of defense against lectins and other harmful substances you unknowingly eat.16

     

    CITATIONS


    1 Cederberg BM, Gray GR. N-Acetyl-D-glucosamine binding lectins. A model system for the study of binding specificity. Anal Biochem. Oct 15, 1979; 99 (1): 221-30. DOI:10.1016/0003-2697(79)90067-8.

    2 Freed DLJ. Do dietary lectins cause disease? BMJ. Apr 17, 1999; 318 (7190): 1023-4. DOI: 10.1136/bmj.318.7190.1023.

    3 Houser J, Komarek J, Kostlanova N, et. al. A soluble fucose-specific lectin from Aspergillus fumigatus conidia–structure, specificity and possible role in fungal pathogenicity. PLoS One. Dec 10, 2013; 8 (12): e83077. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0083077.

    4 Criado MT, Ferreiros CM. Selective interaction of a Fucus vesiculosus lectin-like mucopolysaccharide with several Candida species. Ann Microbiol (Paris). Mar-Apr 1983; 134A (2): 149-54. DOI: 10.1016/S0769-2609(83)80074-X.

    5 Hankins CN, Kindinger JI, Shannon LM. Legume Lectins: I. Immunological Cross-Reactions between the Enzymic Lectin from Mung Beans and other Well Characterized Legume Lectins. Plant Physiol. Jul 1979; 64 (1): 104-7. DOI: 10.1104/pp.64.1.104.

    6 Ofek I, Beachey EH. Mannose binding and epithelial cell adherence of Escherichia coli. Infect Immun. Oct 1978; 22 (1): 247-54. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC422142/. Accessed July 29, 2016.

    7 Wu AM, Jiang YJ, Hwang PY, Shen FS. Characterization of the okra mucilage by interaction with Gal, GalNAc and GlcNAc specific lectins. Biochim Biophys Acta. Feb 23, 1995; 1243 (2): 157-60. DOI: 10.1016/0304-4165(94)00130-P.

    8 Xia F, Zhong Y, Li M, et. al. Antioxidant and Anti-Fatigue Constituents of Okra. Nutrients. Oct 26, 2015; 7 (10): 8846-58. DOI: 10.3390/nu7105435.

    9 McGuckin MA, Lindén SK, Sutton P, Florin TH. Mucin dynamics and enteric pathogens. Nat Rev Microbiol. Apr 2011; 9 (4): 265-78. DOI: 10.1038/nrmicro2538.

    10 Lehmann F, Tiralongo E, Tiralongo J. Sialic acid-specific lectins: occurrence, specificity and function. Cell Mol Life Sci. Jun 2006; 63 (12): 1331-54. DOI: 10.1007/s00018-005-5589-y.

    11 Anderson DM, Brydon WG, Eastwood MA, Sedgwick DM. Dietary effects of sodium alginate in humans. Food Addit Contam. May-Jun 1991; 8 (3): 237-48. DOI: 10.1080/02652039109373974.

    12 Liener I , ed., Sharon N , ed., Goldstein IJ, ed. The Lectins: Properties, Functions, and Applications in Biology and Medicine. New York, NY. Academic Press; 1986: 541.
    13 Freed DLJ at 1023-4.

    14 Usha PR, Naidu MU. Randomised, Double-Blind, Parallel, Placebo-Controlled Study of Oral Glucosamine, Methylsulfonylmethane and their Combination in Osteoarthritis. Clin Drug Investig. Jun 2004; 24 (6): 353-63. DOI: 10.2165/00044011-200424060-00005.

    15 Polysaccharide breakdown by mixed populations of human faecal bacteria. FEMS Microbiol Lett. May 1987; 45 (3): 163-171. DOI: 10.1016/0378-1097(87)90013-9.

    16 VanHook AM. Butyrate benefits the intestinal barrier. Sci Signal. May 26, 2015; 8 (378): ec135. DOI: 10.1126/scisignal.aac619.

    17 Freed D. Do dietary lectins cause disease?: The evidence is suggestive—and raises interesting possibilities for treatment. PubMed Central (PMC). 2018. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1115436/. Accessed April 13, 2018.

    18Berg J, Tymoczko J, Stryer L. Lectins Are Specific Carbohydrate-Binding Proteins. Ncbinlmnihgov. 2018. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK22545/. Accessed April 14, 2018.

     

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    †These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Use only as directed. Consult your healthcare provider before using supplements or providing supplements to children under the age of 18. The information provided herein is intended for your general knowledge only and is not intended to be, nor is it, medical advice or a substitute for medical advice. If you have or suspect you have, a specific medical condition or disease, please consult your healthcare provider.