Ingredients > Syzygium Aromaticum

Syzygium Aromaticum: Top Health Benefits For A Healthy Lifestyle

What Is Syzygium Aromaticum?

This interesting spice, which goes by the common name of clove, has been utilized for years as an agent for food preservation. Syzygium aromaticum happens to be quite rich in the following phytochemicals:

  • Sesquiterpenes
  • Monoterpenes
  • Hydrocarbon
  • Eugenyl acetate
  • Β-caryophyllene1

Syzygium aromaticum usually comes in the form of a dried flower bud. It belongs to the Myrtaceae family native to Indonesia’s Maluku islands (otherwise known as the Spice Islands). However, if you’re looking for where to buy clove now, you should know it is cultivated worldwide for use in cooking or dietary supplements.2

Pharmacologically, clove has been documented in several reviews as a primary source of other phenolic molecules like —

  • Hidroxibenzoic acids
  • Flavonoids
  • Hidroxiphenyl propens
  • Hidroxicinamic acids
  • Eugenol
  • Gallic acid derivatives (hidrolizable tannins)
  • Quercetin
  • Kaempferol
  • Phenolic acids
  • Ferulic acid
  • Caffeic acid
  • Ellagic acid
  • Salicylic acid3

History Of Syzygium Aromaticum

Believe it or not, Syzygium aromaticum dates all the way back to 200 BCE. That was around the time when envoys from Java traveled to China’s Han-dynasty court and delivered gifts of cloves. In fact, clove was held in the mouth to freshen bad breath during an audience with the emperor.4

Later, toward the end of the Middle Ages, Europeans put the clove to work as a way to both preserve and flavor unique dishes. Until the early 1600s, cloves were cultivated in Indonesia. But the Dutch destroyed most clove plants except for those in Amboina and Ternate. They did this in an attempt to create the illusion of scarcity and sustain higher prices.5

Cloves were a feature of the earliest spice trade. Today in Europe and America, the Syzygium aromaticum is used to flavor traditional Christmas holiday foods. They offer particular flavoring benefits to meats and certain baked goods.6

Sources
1 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7072209/
2 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7072209/
3 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7072209/
4 https://www.britannica.com/plant/clove
5 https://www.britannica.com/plant/clove
6 https://www.britannica.com/plant/clove

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