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“I could NEVER give up pizza.” It’s something I hear all the time from first-time patients. And I get it – pizza really is one of America’s favorite foods.

But take a closer look at a standard slice of delivery pizza – a highly-processed flour crust, dairy-like processed cheeses full of casein A-1 and insulin-like growth factor, and lectin-packed tomato sauce. It’s an actual gut bomb – kablooey!

And it’s causing weight gain across the country.

Now, it’s clear the American diet has taken a drastic turn in the last 100 years. But, the last 50 years have been especially troubling, as evidenced by the fact that as a collective population, we’re putting on a lot of weight. In fact, our kids are becoming heavier too.

Turns out, research on the growing rates of obesity in kids shows that it comes down to two common foods. Can you guess what they are?

Industrial chicken and – you guessed it – pizza.

And both of these foods are lectin bombs just waiting to explode. The more processed foods like pizza kids consume each year, the higher their average BMI.1

Now, if you eat pizza (or processed and breaded chicken) regularly, your lectin intake shoots through the roof – and it’s highly likely the numbers on the scale when you weigh yourself will do the same thing.

And you might think it’s guilt free, but even gluten-free pizza is a lectin trap. For starters, the crusts are often made of oat, corn, or rice flour. If that’s not bad enough, pile on the tomato sauce and cheese made from cows with the casein A-1 mutation. You get the idea.

So for my new book, The Plant Paradox, I came up with a “pizza” recipe that’s as healthy as it is delicious … and I want to share it with you today.

Watch the demo here:

Specifically, I call it my

Grilled Portobello Pesto Mini “Pizza”

Make your own pesto, or you can do what I’m doing today and use a high quality pre-made pesto – Costco and Trader Joe’s both make good ones.

To make two pizzas, all you’ll need is:

  • 2 large portobello mushrooms, stems removed
  • Extra-virgin coconut or olive oil
  • 6 tablespoons basil pesto
  • 2 slices Italian prosciutto
  • 1 ball buffalo mozzarella, cut into 1⁄4-to 1⁄2-inch-thick slices
  • Sea salt, preferably iodized, to taste
  • Cracked black pepper, to taste

Set one burner of a gas grill to high, or place a grill pan on the stove with the burner set to medium-high heat.

Rub the cap side of the mushrooms with oil, place on the grill or grill pan cap side up, and grill for about 5 minutes, until the caps begin to brown slightly.

Flip over and grill, gill side up, for another 5 minutes. Remove the mushrooms from the grill or burner. Leave the heat on.

Spoon 3 tablespoons of pesto onto the gill side of one mushroom, add 1 slice prosciutto, arranging it to fit neatly in the gill cup, and then top with half the mozzarella slices. Repeat with the other mushroom.

Return the grill pan to the stove top for about 5 minutes, or until the cheese is melted.

Season with salt and pepper and serve.

So, enjoy the sensation of eating America’s favorite food, without committing a single crime against your body! This is portobello pesto mini pizza is lectin-free and guilt-free.

Bon appétit!

Looking out for you,

 

Dr. Steven Gundry

Here are some simple recipes that Dr. Gundry has demonstrated in the kitchen that are totally Plant Paradox compliant! Watch now:

High-Protein Metabolic Muffins

Good for You Pad Thai

Sources:

1. Gittner, Lisaann Schelli. “From Farm To Fat Kids: The Intersection Of Agricultural And Health Policy”. Etd.ohiolink.edu. N.p., 2017. Web. 15 May 2017.

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